Hands-free devices while driving?

Recently, we came to hear that the government is mulling ban on use of hands-free and Bluetooth technology while driving. Well, just like a coin this topic too has two sides to it. One that we should encourage use of hands-free devices and not ban them while ‘A ban is the correct move’ will be the counter view. In this post, I will justify both the views.

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‘Encourage use of hands-free devices’

While a ban on using a cell phone while driving without hands-free or Bluetooth is vouched for, it’s just going too far to ban people from using Bluetooth and other hands-free devices to conduct conversations while behind the wheel. Talking directly into handset does split the driver’s attention and accidents are more probable as the person behind the wheel is physically incapacitated and this will slow down reaction time. But making or taking calls via hands-free devices makes it easier for the driver to concentrate on his driving too as he doesn’t have to hold the phone.

Moreover, if the government decides to ban the use of hands-free devices while driving, it is like banning talking to somebody sitting beside you in the car or listening to the radio. When technology is at our door step, making it possible for a modern convenience to be used without compromising, why should we pass laws to curb use of technology while driving? The government should spend more time tracking down people who don’t use hands-free devices than banning people who use them.

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The counter view: ‘A ban is the right move’

The government is in the right path by ensuring that no loopholes are left in its laws and including ban on hands-free devices. The assumption that being physically incapacitated distracts the driver is at fault. It is the mental distraction that causes most of the accidents. The people supporting the notion may argue that having a conversation with a fellow passenger should also be banned. But there is a huge difference in having a conversation via a hands free device and talking to a co-passenger.

The difference is that a fellow passenger will keep an eye on the road and will stop or have a pause when needed, while a person on the other hand of the device, has no such clue as to what is happening on the road and the conversation will remain unchanged, demanding the driver’s attention and lessening his focus on the road at the moment, he need it most. Thus, the ministry of road transport and highways is right in banning hands-free devices along with handsets.

Having given you both the sides of this topic, I leave it to you to decide which view you would prefer. After all, perceptions differ.